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23/09/14 @ 11:11am
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Somewhere down this road, I know someone’s waiting

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22/09/14 @ 02:26pm
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otterbender:

The Beifong girls and acupuncture.

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@ 12:27pm
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otterbender:

The Legend of Bumi falling off of stuff.

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@ 12:23am
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@ 12:22am
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891 заметка
21/09/14 @ 11:12pm
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charsiewspace:

Service and sacrifice.

144 заметки
@ 10:47pm
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I think it was Raava doing the reaching out. Because, after Korra "wakes up" that is when she recognizes and says "Dad...you're alive."
wishingformemoria

ikkinthekitsune:

canthre:

ikkinthekitsune:

[snip]

Hm, this makes sense, AS made some pretty strange things with the Avatar before, like keeping him alive in an iceberg, so I guess it’s possible… I suppose the little thing that keeps bugging me a little about this is that coming out because of poison seems kind of… suicidal?

Unless this AS was an unconcious-defense-mechanism sort of AS. And unless Korra decided to end Zaheer no matter the cost when this madness came full-on. Hm, the latter seems quite possible to me. 

Zaheer: Once we administer this poison, your body will naturally react, forcing you into the Avatar State in effort to keep you alive.

That sounds a lot like an unconscious defense mechanism to me.

What’s strange isn’t so much that the unconscious defense mechanism would react as it is that the Avatar Spirit could survive so long with such an obvious weakness.  There’s got to be something specific to the poison that would make ensure Korra’s demise.

One option, as I said, is that the Avatar State always reacts to lethal poisons, but it could fight off almost anything that didn’t involve a bowl full of lethal metal getting forced into the Avatar’s system.

I just thought of another option, though, and I think I might like that one better.  It requires a bit of context, though.

To start with, let’s think about the Avatar State’s decision to seal Aang up in a block of ice.  That clearly wasn’t the best option for keeping him alive in the moment; as we saw in The Storm, the Avatar State could have brought him back to the surface just as easily as it surrounded him in energy and wrapped him in a cocoon of ice.

Destiny is a possible factor, of course, but it’s not the one I prefer.  Instead, I think it’s interesting to look at Aang’s state of mind in each case.  When Aang ran away, he was trying to avoid his duty as Avatar, and the Avatar State reacted by ensuring that he didn’t have to deal with them for a very long time.  When he went down in The Storm, he was determined to do his duty and set the world right, and so the Avatar State made sure he could continue to do so.

Basically, I think the choices that the Avatar State makes has a lot to do with the mindset of the Avatar in question, protecting them from what they fear more than what actually presents a danger to them.

When Wan died, presumably from injuries sustained in battle, the Avatar State didn’t try to save him.  When Roku died — and even when he had poisonous gas shot in his face! — the Avatar State remained silent.  If the Avatar State reacted to impending death or poison, the Avatar Cycle would have ended a long time ago.

What makes a difference, I think, is fear.  Aang didn’t go into the Avatar State because he was dying so much as because he was afraid of dying.  And I think that’s what made it absolutely necessary for Zaheer to poison Korra with mercury as opposed to any old poison.

Korra is not afraid to die.  She’s deactivated the Avatar State due to the danger inherent in maintaining it on at least two occasions — when she was attacked by the Dark Spirit in the middle of the ocean and when Unalaq forced Vaatu down her throat — in an attempt to preserve the cycle.  But, because the mercury attacked her nervous system and made her hallucinate, her ability to fight off that fear was compromised.  The nature of the poison itself ensured that the fear would overpower her before she died, and once it took over, she had no way to push it back down again.

What she could do (and what I strongly suspect she did do) is channel all of that fear into rage so she could retain at least a modicum of control over her actions.  Avatar State Korra fought more like herself in her fight with Tarrlok than Aang in his fight with Ozai — Aang’s Avatar State often made lengthy shows of his power, but Korra’s seemed to want Zaheer dead as quickly and thoroughly as possible.

korrapuffs:

Right! Thats what I thought too. 

It’s interesting how very little of Korra’s POV (so to speak) we get during this fight, and this makes me wonder whether we’ll get some flashbacks/nightmares about it early in Book 4. I guess hallucination would have been possible, but I’ll definately won’t insist on this. I will however insist on Korra being the one who fought Zaheer. It just doesn’t make sense to me otherwise. 

Considering that we’ve seen a flashback nightmare in the first Book 4 clip ever released… I wouldn’t be that surprised if we saw more of it.

Of course, the nightmare didn’t really give us any more of a PoV than the scene itself did, but I think that in and of itself suggests that Korra experienced events in largely the same way as we saw them happen.  It also kind of suggests, in my mind, that she felt like she was in control of her actions otherwise, given that the moment that scared her the most was the moment when she could no longer fight back.

749 заметок
@ 05:28pm
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I have to admit. I had you pegged wrong, I thought you were kinda prissy.

998 заметок
@ 01:03am
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desnaa:

Sacrificing themselves.